DESKTOP & TABLET VERSION (MOBILE BELOW)

Eviction Background Checks

No one wants to find out a renter has a tendency to be evicted the hard way. No matter what your policy is on eviction records, with CIC you’ll get all the information you need to properly screen your rental applicants. With one of the largest nationwide eviction record databases available, you can easily amp up your resident screening process.

Evictions & Eviction Records

What is an Eviction?

An eviction occurs when a rental property owner or landlord tries to remove occupying person(s) from their property. Depending on the owner’s state and local laws, the resident’s willingness to vacate the property after they’ve received a notice or the outcome of the unlawful detainer case, the resident could have an eviction record.

How does a Resident get an Eviction Record?

Generally, if a property owner wants to pursue an eviction or unlawful detainer, they must follow these three steps:

      1. Send a notice of eviction
      2. File the eviction with the courts
      3. Provide evidence at the court hearing & comply with the eviction judgment

State and local law play a big part in an eviction, as some areas may have ‘just cause’ eviction laws, differing notice requirements, and unique eviction record reporting requirements. There are often differences between unlawful detainer requirements for month-to-month and annual tenancies. Universally, a renter will have an eviction record after the rental owner is awarded the unlawful detainer action.

‘Just Cause’ eviction laws are becoming increasingly popular across the U.S. Typically, these eviction laws require property managers and owners to have a distinct ‘good’ (or ‘just’) reason for pursuing an eviction. While ‘just causes’ vary from law to law, commonly accepted reasons are the non-payment of rent, breach of lease, and owner-occupancy. Rental properties that are affected by these laws can only pursue an unlawful detainer if they fit into one of these ‘just cause’ categories.

Eviction check policies for Multifamily Housing Properties

What's Included in an Eviction Search?

Unfortunately, not all eviction searches are created equal, and you’ll need to investigate whether or not your background screening company even includes a nationwide eviction scan. CIC, on the other hand, has the largest eviction database of its kind with access to more than 36 million landlord-tenant records from every major jurisdiction in the country.

CIC's Unique Nationwide Eviction Search Includes:

  • Past Court Actions
  • Unlawful Detainers
  • Monetary Judgments
  • Court-Ordered Possession
  • Property Damage Claims
0 +
Nationwide Eviction Reports

How to See Your Applicant's Eviction Records

Eviction records are one of the best pieces of information to know when considering a rental applicant. Regardless if you’re a property management company, public housing authority, apartment association, or an independent rental owner (IRO), knowing if your applicant has been previously evicted is a direct indicator of if they’re right for your rental unit.

While CIC offers nationwide eviction records in our background screening reports, unfortunately, not all resident screening services do this. Without nationwide eviction data, the chances of seeing your applicant’s eviction records are slim.

On the credit report, you might be able to see monetary judgments if filed up to the credit bureau’s new standards, but it won’t include any non-monetary civil cases (like judgments for possession). You also won’t see any eviction filings. Due to the National Consumer Assistance Plan (NCAP), the credit bureaus report on less than 10% of eviction cases.

On the criminal report, you will only see an applicant’s eviction record if the renter had some type of criminal charge attached to the eviction. However, ultimately, evictions are filed as civil records, and without a rare criminal charge, you won’t be seeing most evictions on the criminal report.

Unless your resident screening service explicitly includes nationwide eviction data (not just eviction records from your state), the chances you’ll see your applicant’s eviction records on a basic resident screening report is near to none.

The Myths and Facts of Eviction Reports

Do you know the truth behind these common eviction reporting myths?

MYTH

A Social Security Number (SSN) is needed to find eviction records.

FACT

When a rental property owner files for unlawful detainer, the social security number is rarely included. If you’re looking to get your applicant’s eviction records on your resident screening report, look for a company that uses the applicant’s name and address for matching.

MYTH

The credit report shows any and all evictions.

FACT

Most evictions won't appear on the credit report. The credit bureaus report on less than 10% of eviction cases, and only if it resulted in a monetary judgment. The National Consumer Assistance Plan (NCAP) has reduced this even further.

Including Eviction Reports in your Leasing Process

Eviction Search Benefits

Evicting a renter can be incredibly costly. Between court fees, collection services, and time-related costs, the price of an eviction report is minuscule comparatively. Rather than be in the dark about a rental applicant’s prior eviction judgments, including an eviction scan into your leasing process can give you peace of mind with your final rental decision.

By using CIC’s eviction search (and resident screening in general) to assess rental candidates and current renters, you reap these benefits:

  • Aids in Protecting your Investments
  • More Information at No Inconvenience - eviction reports process in 2.6 seconds!
  • Records Reported are Fair Housing Act Compliant

3 Essentials to Choosing a Resident Screening Service

Choosing a resident screening service with a nationwide eviction scan is incredibly important, but it’s not the only thing you’ll want to pay close attention to. When considering a screening service, look at these 3 essential points:

Your resident screening company should be trying to get you your report as quickly as possible. As they say, time is money, and you wouldn’t want to miss out on a good resident.

At CIC, our average report time is just 5 seconds. Talk about speed!

If you’re looking for a background report that includes eviction data, make sure you’re getting a nationwide scan – not a state-wide scan. CIC has the largest nationwide eviction database available.

Aside from the eviction scan range, pay attention to the quality of their credit and criminal history checks.

With any service, a reliable, good relationship is necessary. Seek out companies that have your best interests at heart -providing you with additional resources, staff training and compliance education.

Find the Perfect Resident Screening Service for your Company.

Eviction Reports FAQ

If a landlord or property manager wishes to evict a renter, after complying with state and local laws, they may file for an unlawful detainer (eviction) with the courts. Regardless of who the court sides with, once the court decides the case, it becomes an eviction judgment. Both the eviction filing and judgment are technically eviction records.

When a property owner files for an unlawful detainer, that becomes an eviction filing. Once the court decides, that decision is known as the eviction judgment. Not every filing result in a public judgment, as most state and city laws automatically expunge the eviction if the renter wins. The resident could also come to equal terms with the property owner after filing – resulting in no need to proceed with the case and get a judgment. You can learn more about the differences of judgments and filings here.

An eviction becomes public record when a judgment, and a filing in jurisdictions that allow reporting, is entered by the court, but there are plenty of circumstances in which an eviction record could be expunged (removed from public records) or sealed. For example, in California, there is a 60 day period after the eviction is filed where the filing is sealed. Unmasking the case requires a judgment issued by a California Superior Court.

YMany states allow the renter to file for expungement to remove or seal the eviction from their records. Typically, tenants will need a valid reason (like the unlawful detainer action was not awarded to the property owner) in order for the expungement to be granted.

While a monetary judgment against a renter who didn’t pay their rent might be picked up by the credit bureau as a collection account, most evictions won’t appear. After the credit bureaus released their National Consumer Assistance Plan, the likelihood of a monetary eviction judgment being picked up on the credit report is incredibly low.

Unless the eviction record carried some sort of criminal charge attached to it, the eviction would be filed as a civil record and would not be on a criminal report.

CIC’s is! We’re able to offer nationwide eviction searches because we’ve created our own database – drawing from landlord-tenant records from each of the major jurisdictions throughout the county. That being said, there’s no all-encompassing federal eviction database.

Per the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 605.a, evictions are reported for 7 years. In Oregon, it’s 5 years (Senate Bill 91). If you see an eviction that is dated more than 7 years (or in Oregon’s case, five), do not use that record when considering whether to rent to a prospective resident.

It’s up to your discretion on whether you wish to accept or deny applicants with evictions. However, be aware there are reporting restrictions (FCRA Sect. 605) in relation to Adverse Actions for civil suites, collections, and “any other adverse item of information”.

Although eviction laws can vary from state to state (and even from individual cities), we’ve compiled a quick guide on the A’s to Z’s of the eviction process. Plus, it has some quick tips on things to be mindful of before you nose-dive into an unlawful detainer suit.

learn more about eviction records

800.288.4757 opt 2

available from 6:00 am – 4:00 pm PST

MOBLILE VERSION

Eviction Background Checks

No one wants to find out a renter has a tendency to be evicted the hard way. No matter what your policy is on eviction records, with CIC you’ll get all the information you need to properly screen your rental applicants. With one of the largest nationwide eviction record databases available, you can easily amp up your resident screening process.

Evictions & Eviction Records

What is an Eviction?

An eviction occurs when a rental property owner or landlord tries to remove occupying person(s) from their property. Depending on the owner’s state and local laws, the resident’s willingness to vacate the property after they’ve received a notice or the outcome of the unlawful detainer case, the resident could have an eviction record.

How does a Resident get an Eviction Record?

Generally, if a property owner wants to pursue an eviction or unlawful detainer, they must follow these three steps:

  1. Send a notice of eviction
  2. File the eviction with the courts
  3. Provide evidence at the court hearing & comply with the eviction judgment

State and local law play a big part in an eviction, as some areas may have ‘just cause’ eviction laws, differing notice requirements, and unique eviction record reporting requirements. There are often differences between unlawful detainer requirements for month-to-month and annual tenancies. Universally, a renter will have an eviction record after the rental owner is awarded the unlawful detainer action.

‘Just Cause’ eviction laws are becoming increasingly popular across the U.S. Typically, these eviction laws require property managers and owners to have a distinct ‘good’ (or ‘just’) reason for pursuing an eviction. While ‘just causes’ vary from law to law, commonly accepted reasons are the non-payment of rent, breach of lease, and owner-occupancy. Rental properties that are affected by these laws can only pursue an unlawful detainer if they fit into one of these ‘just cause’ categories.

Eviction check policies for Multifamily Housing Properties

What's Included in an Eviction Search?

Unfortunately, not all eviction searches are created equal, and you’ll need to investigate whether or not your background screening company even includes a nationwide eviction scan. CIC, on the other hand, has the largest eviction database of its kind with access to more than 36 million landlord-tenant records from every major jurisdiction in the country.

CIC's Unique Nationwide Eviction Search Includes:

  • Past Court Actions
  • Unlawful Detainers
  • Monetary Judgments
  • Court-Ordered Possession
  • Property Damage Claims
0 + Million
Nationwide Eviction Reports

How to See Your Applicant's Eviction Records

Eviction records are one of the best pieces of information to know when considering a rental applicant. Regardless if you’re a property management company, public housing authority, apartment association, or an independent rental owner (IRO), knowing if your applicant has been previously evicted is a direct indicator of if they’re right for your rental unit.

While CIC offers nationwide eviction records in our background screening reports, unfortunately, not all resident screening services do this. Without nationwide eviction data, the chances of seeing your applicant’s eviction records are slim.

On the credit report, you might be able to see monetary judgments if filed up to the credit bureau’s new standards, but it won’t include any non-monetary civil cases (like judgments for possession). You also won’t see any eviction filings. Due to the National Consumer Assistance Plan (NCAP), the credit bureaus report on less than 10% of eviction cases.

On the criminal report, you will only see an applicant’s eviction record if the renter had some type of criminal charge attached to the eviction. However, ultimately, evictions are filed as civil records, and without a rare criminal charge, you won’t be seeing most evictions on the criminal report.

Unless your resident screening service explicitly includes nationwide eviction data (not just eviction records from your state), the chances you’ll see your applicant’s eviction records on a basic resident screening report is near to none.

The Myths and Facts of Eviction Reports

Do you know the truth behind these common eviction reporting myths?

MYTH: The credit report shows any and all evictions.
FACT: Most evictions won’t appear on the credit report. The credit bureaus report on less than 10% of eviction cases, and only if it resulted in a monetary judgment. The National Consumer Assistance Plan (NCAP) has reduced this even further.
MYTH: A SSN is needed to find eviction records.
FACT: When a rental property owner files for an unlawful detainer, the social security number is rarely included. If you’re looking to get your applicant’s eviction records, look for a resident screening company that uses the applicant’s name and address for matching.
Previous
Next

Including Eviction Reports in your Leasing Process

Eviction Search Benefits

Evicting a renter can be incredibly costly. Between court fees, collection services, and time-related costs, the price of an eviction report is minuscule comparatively. Rather than be in the dark about a rental applicant’s prior eviction judgments, including an eviction scan into your leasing process can give you peace of mind with your final rental decision.

By using CIC’s eviction search (and resident screening in general) to assess rental candidates and current renters, you reap these benefits:

  • Aids in Protecting your Investments
  • More Information at No Inconvenience - eviction reports process in 2.6 seconds!
  • Records Reported are Fair Housing Act Compliant

3 Essentials to Choosing a Resident Screening Service

Choosing a resident screening service with a nationwide eviction scan is incredibly important, but it’s not the only thing you’ll want to pay close attention to. When considering a screening service, look at these 3 essential points:

Your resident screening company should be trying to get you your report as quickly as possible. As they say, time is money, and you wouldn’t want to miss out on a good resident.

At CIC, our average report time is just 5 seconds. Talk about speed!

If you’re looking for a background report that includes eviction data, make sure you’re getting a nationwide scan – not a state-wide scan. CIC has the largest nationwide eviction database available.

Aside from the eviction scan range, pay attention to the quality of their credit and criminal history checks.

With any service, a reliable, good relationship is necessary. Seek out companies that have your best interests at heart -providing you with additional resources, staff training and compliance education.

Find the Perfect Resident Screening Service for your Company.

Eviction Reports FAQ

If a landlord or property manager wishes to evict a renter, after complying with state and local laws, they may file for an unlawful detainer (eviction) with the courts. Regardless of who the court sides with, once the court decides the case, it becomes an eviction judgment. Both the eviction filing and judgment are technically eviction records.

When a property owner files for an unlawful detainer, that becomes an eviction filing. Once the court decides, that decision is known as the eviction judgment. Not every filing result in a public judgment, as most state and city laws automatically expunge the eviction if the renter wins. The resident could also come to equal terms with the property owner after filing – resulting in no need to proceed with the case and get a judgment. You can learn more about the differences of judgments and filings here.

An eviction becomes public record when a judgment, and a filing in jurisdictions that allow reporting, is entered by the court, but there are plenty of circumstances in which an eviction record could be expunged (removed from public records) or sealed. For example, in California, there is a 60 day period after the eviction is filed where the filing is sealed. Unmasking the case requires a judgment issued by a California Superior Court.

YMany states allow the renter to file for expungement to remove or seal the eviction from their records. Typically, tenants will need a valid reason (like the unlawful detainer action was not awarded to the property owner) in order for the expungement to be granted.

While a monetary judgment against a renter who didn’t pay their rent might be picked up by the credit bureau as a collection account, most evictions won’t appear. After the credit bureaus released their National Consumer Assistance Plan, the likelihood of a monetary eviction judgment being picked up on the credit report is incredibly low.

Unless the eviction record carried some sort of criminal charge attached to it, the eviction would be filed as a civil record and would not be on a criminal report.

CIC’s is! We’re able to offer nationwide eviction searches because we’ve created our own database – drawing from landlord-tenant records from each of the major jurisdictions throughout the county. That being said, there’s no all-encompassing federal eviction database.

Per the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 605.a, evictions are reported for 7 years. In Oregon, it’s 5 years (Senate Bill 91). If you see an eviction that is dated more than 7 years (or in Oregon’s case, five), do not use that record when considering whether to rent to a prospective resident.

It’s up to your discretion on whether you wish to accept or deny applicants with evictions. However, be aware there are reporting restrictions (FCRA Sect. 605) in relation to Adverse Actions for civil suites, collections, and “any other adverse item of information”.

Although eviction laws can vary from state to state (and even from individual cities), we’ve compiled a quick guide on the A’s to Z’s of the eviction process. Plus, it has some quick tips on things to be mindful of before you nose-dive into an unlawful detainer suit.

learn more about eviction records

available from 6:00 am – 4:00 pm PST