How to Check and See if Your Residents are Okay in the Crisis

There are countless ways to be a good property manager. You can have timely repair services, great community communication, or welcome baskets and holiday presents. Perhaps you have delightful pet policies with furry friends abound. Right now, checking in on your renters and being considerate of the effects of the current coronavirus pandemic, wins you property manager of the year.

There are countless ways to be a good property manager. You can have timely repair services, great community communication, or welcome baskets and holiday presents. Perhaps you have delightful pet policies with furry friends abound. Right now, checking in on your renters and being considerate of the effects of the current coronavirus pandemic, wins you property manager of the year.

Comforting

You may expect that as people begin to look for rentals again, a standard question rental applicants will ask is how did you handle COVID-19 with your residents? A favorable answer is: I checked in to make sure everyone was okay.

These instructions are not about getting this month’s rent, warning about rent, or anything similar. Consider this only as a way to improve relations and reputation, which, in the long game, may be helpful.

Comforting

You may expect that as people begin to look for rentals again, a standard question rental applicants will ask is how did you handle COVID-19 with your residents? A favorable answer is: I checked in to make sure everyone was okay.

These instructions are not about getting this month’s rent, warning about rent, or anything similar. Consider this only as a way to improve relations and reputation, which, in the long game, may be helpful.

How to Check In

The worrisome part of this is that not everyone is, in fact, okay. People are struggling, they are out of work and out of paychecks. According to CNBC, around 30% of renters couldn’t pay April’s rent. The employment percentage was and is devasted by the health scare, making more people obsessed with their Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Safety from the elements is over food and water, which means rent, in many cases, has come second.

How to Check In

The worrisome part of this is that not everyone is, in fact, okay. People are struggling, they are out of work and out of paychecks. According to CNBC, around 30% of renters couldn’t pay April’s rent. The employment percentage was and is devasted by the health scare, making more people obsessed with their Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

Safety from the elements is over food and water, which means rent, in many cases, has come second.

child hugging father

Your residents have no pay, which means they need to save for their most basic of needs, food. Since they’re out of work, they also need to worry about medicine. It is important to remember that your residents are likely to be stressed, preoccupied, and overwhelmed. Their property manager or owner knocking on their door is likely to worry them even more.

child hugging father

Your residents have no pay, which means they need to save for their most basic of needs, food. Since they’re out of work, they also need to worry about medicine. It is important to remember that your residents are likely to be stressed, preoccupied, and overwhelmed. Their property manager or owner knocking on their door is likely to worry them even more.

A Suggestion: Be gentle.

It is not advisable to check in on your residents whilst in a bad mood. If you’ve spent all day yelling at the bank, don’t follow up with a conversation with your renters.

After standard polite greetings, you can move forward with the reason you’re calling. Something along the lines of,  I wanted to check in. Times are rough, how is everyone doing? Are they healthy? Can you get groceries?

A Suggestion: Be gentle.

It is not advisable to check in on your residents whilst in a bad mood. If you’ve spent all day yelling at the bank, don’t follow up with a conversation with your renters.

After standard polite greetings, you can move forward with the reason you’re calling. Something along the lines of,  I wanted to check in. Times are rough, how is everyone doing? Are they healthy? Can you get groceries?

Residents may be worried that you are only calling for money, and no one likes those conversations. As of now, public relations with rental owners, property managers and leasing staff are very fraught and disapproving. According to the Guardian, a major component of being a good listener is to not be ‘afraid of silence.’ Let them think about what they want to say. Let them think about their answers. Let them speak freely.

Residents may be worried that you are only calling for money, and no one likes those conversations. As of now, public relations with rental owners, property managers and leasing staff are very fraught and disapproving. According to the Guardian, a major component of being a good listener is to not be ‘afraid of silence.’ Let them think about what they want to say. Let them think about their answers. Let them speak freely.

A Suggestion: Be a friendly shoulder.

When talking to your residents, keep in mind that there are a lot of ways you can help. Any small act of kindness can go far in the long game. Boost morale with community movie nights and other easy resident events. Give a care package complete with a spare roll of your toilet paper. Perhaps a kid graduated and never had the ceremony, so you can send a congratulations card. A small act can brighten their day and show that you care. You can offer advice to show that you are listening and that you care but be considerate and accommodating.

Checking on your residents can be complicated in these times. If you have your mask and gloves, it is still worthwhile to make that effort. Be safe, and be caring in these times where just about everyone is stressed out.

A Suggestion: Be a friendly shoulder.

When talking to your residents, keep in mind that there are a lot of ways you can help. Any small act of kindness can go far in the long game. Boost morale with community movie nights and other easy resident events. Give a care package complete with a spare roll of your toilet paper. Perhaps a kid graduated and never had the ceremony, so you can send a congratulations card. A small act can brighten their day and show that you care. You can offer advice to show that you are listening and that you care but be considerate and accommodating.

Checking on your residents can be complicated in these times. If you have your mask and gloves, it is still worthwhile to make that effort. Be safe, and be caring in these times where just about everyone is stressed out.

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Nicole Seidner

Cole Seidner is a copywriter here at the CIC Blog. She holds a degree in Writing from Savannah College of Art and Design with a focus in creative nonfiction. Her free time is spent taking pictures of her dogs or reading deep dive analysis on movies that she hasn’t seen.

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