Let’s Rewind: What Do You Need To Know About Eviction Public Records

Whether you’re a rental property owner looking over their applicant’s consumer report or a bank using public records to gauge landlord mortgage rates, it’s important to understand eviction record basics. What’s the difference between filing for an eviction versus an eviction record? How do you know if an eviction database is right for your study or app? If you’re struggling to get back in gear and can’t remember the basics, we’ve got you covered.

What is an Eviction Public Record?

Whether you’re a rental property owner looking over their applicant’s consumer report or a bank using public records to gauge landlord mortgage rates, it’s important to understand eviction record basics. What’s the difference between filing for an eviction versus an eviction record? How do you know if an eviction database is right for your study or app? If you’re struggling to get back in gear and can’t remember the basics, we’ve got you covered.

What is an Eviction Public Record?

There’s a big difference between an eviction notice and an official eviction public record. If a property manager, like the fore-landlords before, post a notice on their residents’ door, that’s a notice. Many residents pay the past due balance. Some residents wise up and rise up quick, picking up their things and high tailing it out. They leave before anything escalates, and that works in both favors. They don’t get an eviction public record and you get your space back (or, in the forementioned example, you get past due rent).  In either case, the presence of an eviction notice is not a public record.

There’s a big difference between an eviction notice and an official eviction public record. If a property manager, like the fore-landlords before, post a notice on their residents’ door, that’s a notice. Many residents pay the past due balance. Some residents wise up and rise up quick, picking up their things and high tailing it out. They leave before anything escalates, and that works in both favors. They don’t get an eviction public record and you get your space back (or, in the forementioned example, you get past due rent).  In either case, the presence of an eviction notice is not a public record.

An eviction public record means someone has gone to court and been convicted. It takes more than a notice, bulletin, email, or more modern means, to become a public record. Additionally, an eviction filing – while public record – does not mean the renter was convicted.

Why are Some Eviction Databases Better than Others?

Plenty of places may have the information that you want such as eviction record histories, criminal background checks and credit scores, but that doesn’t mean it will be an intuitive source. The problem that becomes quickly apparent is when a database lacks the specificity clients need to make better informed decisions.

An eviction public record means someone has gone to court and been convicted. It takes more than a notice, bulletin, email, or more modern means, to become a public record. Additionally, an eviction filing – while public record – does not mean the renter was convicted.

Why are Some Eviction Databases Better than Others?

Plenty of places may have the information that you want such as eviction record histories, criminal background checks and credit scores, but that doesn’t mean it will be an intuitive source. The problem that becomes quickly apparent is when a database lacks the specificity clients need to make better informed decisions.

The risk mitigation provider you use should be able to match identities with ease and accuracy. When looking for an eviction record provider, the service you choose should have a high quality algorithm that not only accurately matches identities but also consistently vets the information you’re provided with. Check to see if they do things like vetting for duplicate records or for missing personally identifiable information (PII). The only way to check coverage and be sure all blind spots are eliminated or covered is with vigilance, repeated due diligence, and thorough examination.

The risk mitigation provider you use should be able to match identities with ease and accuracy. When looking for an eviction record provider, the service you choose should have a high quality algorithm that not only accurately matches identities but also consistently vets the information you’re provided with. Check to see if they do things like vetting for duplicate records or for missing personally identifiable information (PII). The only way to check coverage and be sure all blind spots are eliminated or covered is with vigilance, repeated due diligence, and thorough examination.

A good provider should be able to filter your public record searches in order to minimize you or your end users’ legal liabilities. If your public record provider doesn’t give options to keep banned or potentially illegal information out of its delivered reports, then all liability would go to the end users’ (like CRAs or property managers) that receive it. This leaves those in the rental housing industry open for lawsuits when residents realize they were refused tenancy based on what could be protected classes.  Or, perhaps, it sent an eviction public record, which is innocuous on its own, but the date of it made it illegal to use based on the area of the property, leaving clients in a sticky mess.

A good provider should be able to filter your public record searches in order to minimize you or your end users’ legal liabilities. If your public record provider doesn’t give options to keep banned or potentially illegal information out of its delivered reports, then all liability would go to the end users’ (like CRAs or property managers) that receive it. This leaves those in the rental housing industry open for lawsuits when residents realize they were refused tenancy based on what could be protected classes.  Or, perhaps, it sent an eviction public record, which is innocuous on its own, but the date of it made it illegal to use based on the area of the property, leaving clients in a sticky mess.

How Long does an Eviction Public Record Stay Public?

That entirely depends on the place the property is. In some places, like New York City, there can be no use of eviction records as they are all banned with up to $1,000 violation fees.  Most records note that it is only recent evictions that would affect banking and mortgage related queries. Many states use a general seven-year rule, banning use of eviction records that are older than seven years, while some states go under. It’s important to keep these time limits in mind when thinking about eviction records.

How Long does an Eviction Public Record Stay Public?

That entirely depends on the place the property is. In some places, like New York City, there can be no use of eviction records as they are all banned with up to $1,000 violation fees.  Most records note that it is only recent evictions that would affect banking and mortgage related queries. Many states use a general seven-year rule, banning use of eviction records that are older than seven years, while some states go under. It’s important to keep these time limits in mind when thinking about eviction records.

With all that in mind builds to the reason one should take care when picking where to get their eviction public records. It’s easy to get the information, but with the right service, you’ll get high quality, low risk information that is perfect for clientele and keeping said clientele safe. With CIC you get free access to the Regulatory Matrix, which will answer some of the concerns. The Matrix is perfectly designed to filter out the information that shouldn’t be used. Are you concerned about when public records expire? The Matrix will hide all eviction public records that do not meet the limit – seven year, under, or completely banned like in New York City – before your clients could get in trouble for seeing them. With the high quality data that CIC provides, you and your clientele will have better experience as you scour the right information to make the safest, most educated decisions you can.

With all that in mind builds to the reason one should take care when picking where to get their eviction public records. It’s easy to get the information, but with the right service, you’ll get high quality, low risk information that is perfect for clientele and keeping said clientele safe. With CIC you get free access to the Regulatory Matrix, which will answer some of the concerns. The Matrix is perfectly designed to filter out the information that shouldn’t be used. Are you concerned about when public records expire? The Matrix will hide all eviction public records that do not meet the limit – seven year, under, or completely banned like in New York City – before your clients could get in trouble for seeing them. With the high quality data that CIC provides, you and your clientele will have better experience as you scour the right information to make the safest, most educated decisions you can.

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Cole Seidner is a copywriter here at the CIC Blog. She holds a degree in Writing from Savannah College of Art and Design with a focus in creative nonfiction. Her free time is spent taking pictures of her dogs or reading deep dive analysis on movies that she hasn’t seen.

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